Friday, February 09, 2018

Of sheep and trees and seasons

My sheep seem to have an affinity for trees,
especially the big fir in their pasture.
I find this odd, since their homeland is about as treeless a place as I've seen from the Shetland blogs I follow. Scroll through the photos here to see what I mean.

Bare trees here are starting to change. Buds are swelling, blurring the clean, hard lines of branch against sky.

We've had it easy this winter – no snowfall; no deep freezes. The bucket and stock tank heaters, the tire chains have all stayed in storage. That isn't terribly unusual at our elevation, less than 2000 feet above sea level, but the situation hasn't been much better up in the mountains, where a sufficient snowpack is vital for urban and agricultural water supplies. It does no good to worry, but things aren't looking good for summer.

Anyway, I'm on a roll; this is my fifth post in five days. (Tap, tap; is this blog on? Not many commenters out there! Go ahead; make my day and leave me a comment. ;-)

That's it for now from . . .


11 comments:

sylkan said...

Yep, you are being read. It always starts my day off right to read your posts. I especially liked the photo of you, Brian and Jackson. I was glad you had not had to commit kid-icide. It's a wonder any of us ever live to grow up.

Donna said...

I am reading and enjoying. Blog away!

Florida Farm Girl said...

Oh, we're still here. Just keeping quiet. Now, some of us haven't posted in ages.

Anonymous said...

just too cold-snowy-icy here to move around much. i've shoveled more snow this season than the last two or three winters combined. last year, i didn't have to shovel even once. but i'm not really complaining about the snow (pa and ny always get it worse than here) - the cold has been worse this year. yesterday was the first day above freezing in a long time - maybe we're into the spring thaw now (i hope, i hope, i hope). at least it's been slow so far and no flooding. am settling in this weekend for some freezer cleaning and freezer cooking. --suz in farmy NE ohio

Debbie said...

I always look for your blog posts. And I'm sorry I don't leave comments as often as I should.

Thank you always for sharing beautiful photos and thoughts.

Are you going for 'six in six'?

Helen said...

Yep, still checking in to read what is happening with you and your family. :)

Claire Moxon-Waltz said...

My sheep seem to love chewing the bark off the trees - it's nice that yours seem to leave them alone. Mine get girdled and die. Your winter sounds positively perfect to me, except for the part about the snowpack in the higher elevations.

Mike Creason said...

I read your blog as often as you post. Today, you talked about Shetland. I have been there and it is treeless. Beautiful , and full of sheep and long haired cows. It is beautiful! Please keep up with the blog.

Mama Pea said...

I wonder if being under that big, beautiful tree gives them a sense of security? From what, I don't know, but still . . .

Michelle said...

First of all, thank-you, ALL of you, for commenting! Three of you, Suz, Helen and Mike, are followers I didn't even know I had; it's always a delightful surprise to "meet" new readers. Sylvia, I miss seeing you at CMC meetings; the teenager has indeed been keeping me . . . busy . . . but it warms my heart to know you are still here reading my blogs. Donna, FFG, Debbie, Claire, and Mama Pea; you are all blogpals I appreciate and read, too.

Debbie, just for you I'll go "six for six"! ;-)

Anonymous said...

Hi Michelle,
I do enjoy reading about your adventures with sheep and parenting :). In real life I talk too much, so perhaps I make up for it by being a quiet reader.

M in NC