Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Monday in nursery rhymes

"Baa baa, black sheep; have you any room? No sir, no sir; I'm caught firm."

"Michelle had a little lamb whose fleece was white as snow, and everywhere that Michelle went that lamb was sure to go."

"Lancelot is falling down, falling down, falling down; Lancelot is falling down, my fair lady."

"All the king's horses and all the king's men couldn't put Lance's bridle together again."

Monday was a beautiful day, our warmest this year. I turned the ewes and lambs out on pasture for their daily dose of rich grass. For some reason, I was particularly concerned about the big coyote Brian said he saw running along our north pasture fence not too long ago; the neighbor says it's a female with pups – think "HUNGRY." After watching the sheep through the windows for awhile, I decided I could as easily keep an eye on the sheep from horseback, and went down to tack up Lance. (Rick has said he could be ridden at the walk for 15-20 minutes a day now.)

At the beginning of my ride, Benny and Jet were bopping back and forth under the gate separating their pasture from the one bordering the arena. Then Jet stopped bopping. I halted Lance to take a closer look (and a blurry photo) –

Jet was hiplocked between the gate and the post! I watched and waited, hoping he'd figure out that he could back up, but no. I sighed, dismounted, looped Lance's reins over a post, and went to rescue the silly sheep. Of course, as soon as Benny saw me, he raced to my feet and attached himself like Velcro. After disengaging Jet, I tried to evade Benny – turning back to the arena to see Lance rolling on my saddle in the sand! I raced towards him, yelling, to get him back on his feet, nearly tripping over my little white shadow. I scooped up Benny so he couldn't be trampled by human OR horse, shortened Lance's connection to the post so he wouldn't have room to roll again, and tried again to lose a lamb. Hearing something I looked towards the arena to see Lance sitting back and struggling to get free – and felt Benny bump my leg. AHHHHHHHHhhhhhhhhggggggg!!! I couldn't do a thing but watch as my beautiful bridle gave way under the tremendous strain – that, and resist the powerful urge to perform animal sacrifices on the spot!

Life on a farm is NOT laid back, at . . .

11 comments:

Theresa said...

Oh bummer.......I bet it can be fixed though, you just need to find a good cobbler or saddle repair place. We have one in Ashland, maybe a trip down with broken bridle in hand? ;)

I have a horse that panics when hard tied, so it's not something I ever do. Maybe a blocker tie ring somewhere in the arena with a lead rope on it. The lead rope will come out if they really pull. Works well in the trailer too

Mama Pea said...

Yikes! All you needed to handle that situation was a clone . . . or two!

fiberjoy said...

Whew - It's good you didn't re-injure your knee during all that commotion!

These types of situations is why ground-tying was one of the first things I taught my young Arab. I could trust him to stand still as long as his reins hung down. Many gates opened, fences worked on, branches pulled into a makeshift jump, as well as the ferrier working on his hooves whilst he was ground tied.

Ruth Dixon said...

And I know you know the rules about never tying with reins, but we all have done it one time or another (ask me about when my sister tied a metal bucket to her reins because she didn't want to pack it). Is your saddle okay? Had a mare roll once in a salt-water creek with a saddle on. She was lucky she didn't end up being glue!

Fiona said...

Good grief thats a tale of things going wrong all at once! Yes we have all bridle tied and had broken tack! I hope there was no trip to the glue factory and your knee is ok! Ahh the threat of animal sacrifice can work wonders..I know they understand threats! The next ride will go better RIGHT!

Leigh said...

Life on a farm is a constant vigil! Almost sounds like you had your own miniature 3-ring circus going on for a moment or two. Sounds like all is well in the end, thankfully.

Tombstone Livestock said...

Sounds like your leg is getting better, don't reinjure it now. One reason I hate bottle lambs or goats they come charging at you the moment they see you and are not easily distracted. Bottle goat kept getting out last week while I was on the tractor and trying to put up shearing pens. Finally had to swap out panels so she could not get out.

Susan said...

I see that there is a little separation anxiety going on in the lambie area...

Nancy Kay said...

Wow...what a rodeo!

thecrazysheeplady said...

Yikes! Sounds like here ;-o.

shelly hancock said...

Oh goodness, like the saying goes, When it rains, it pours. At least no one was injured. That naughty Lance! I hope a good leather worker can repair your bridle.