Monday, May 26, 2008

S is for silly sheep, "Supersheep"

We've all heard that the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence, but what if there is no grass at all on the other side of the fence?As this photo proves, it doesn't lessen the appeal!

Nearly every morning I turn the sheep out to graze freely while I do the rest of the chores. After eagerly gobbling up all things green for awhile, the sheep start yelling at me (especially Valentine; I should nickname her "Ol' Yeller"!). They've had enough salad; they want DESSERT! What can I say? They are sheep after my own heart. So I ration out their little dab of morning grain and let them in the sheep lot.
As soon as they finish the grain, they all crowd around the fenceline hay feeder like they are starving.
Then there's Bella. She is my Shetland Lipizzaner. She has perfected the Airs Above the Ground in her pursuit of leaves.
Poor Brava is still in quarantine most of the time. Some mornings she gets to join the others for salad, but then I put her back in the fold. She is eating well and has plenty of energy, but I'm afraid the "men before their time" ramlings would run her into the ground. Not only that, but her wool has been falling off almost as fast as water runs off a duck's back. Our weather has turned cool and rainy, so I was afraid she would get chilled. It was time for action. Today in a matter of minutes, I helped her go from "sad sack" -to "Supersheep"!Then I added a Rocky Sheep Suit for a little more protection. She seemed to appreciate my ministrations; I think the loose wool was tickling her. Becky mentioned that when she plucked a sheep of hers who had a break in the wool from sickness, it grew back wondrously soft like a lamb's fleece, so I guess I have that to look forward to. What Brava lost was very soft and I hate wasting it, but it's pretty short stapled since she was sheared three months ago and I have too much on my plate to think I will get around to processing it.

That's it for now at . . .

9 comments:

Tammy said...

Hi Michele - I'm glad to see that Brava is doing better. Love the green sheep cover and coat - very slick! We haven't sheared yet, ours are all starting to shed and look quite sad - but my shearer is coming out this Sunday to tidy things up a bit.
I must say - I'm really enjoying your blog - especially the pictures of the irises - I'm debating doing a bed of them next year - all different colours.

Leigh said...

What a fun post. It is interesting to get a glimpse of their personalities.

Tammy said...

Glad to hear Valentine is doing better. She sure had a rough go of it. I don't think I've ever had one go that slick even after being sick! Did you ever figure out what was wrong with her? Some of my bigger white sheep have the 'airs above ground' down pretty pat too. It just burns Rain (little grey Shetland) to no end that they are tall enough to reach goodies SHE can't! ;-)
Tammy

Kathy said...

After watching my sheep eat, I often wonder why they weren't called "hogs" instead of "sheep". heeheehee!

Becky Utecht said...

Brava looks very sleek in the green coat. I know what a pain those older ram lambs can be to the poor ewes. I hope Brava continues to do well and can get back out with flock soon. Your photos of the sheep are great -- yes, they are always driven by their stomachs. ;-)

sheepsclothing said...

Michele- I'm so glad to hear that Brava is on the mend. She looks sharp in the green outfit, and I'm sure she appreciates all your efforts!

Sharon said...

Brava is wearing a Sheep Speedo - very stylish - compliments her eyes.

Windyridge said...

Love the photo of the sheep reaching up into the tree.

Heather said...

I've been praying and keeping up with your posts on Brava. It's so good to see her on the mend and looking so fine :o)