Thursday, May 01, 2008

D is for dogs, of course!

First of all, thank-you so much for your kind comments on the Sonnet. I agree with you; it doesn't look half bad on me in that photo. But that was within the first five minutes of trying it on; by the end of the next day, it had grown at least three sizes. Because of the oversized neckline and heavy sleeves, I have to keep tugging at the shoulders to keep in on - and then fold my arms. It is distracting enough when others constantly fuss with their clothes; it drives me crazy when I have to! For the record, this garment weighs over three pounds....

Jackson is lookin' good. In fact, Jackson is the purtiest, fluffiest, softest dog we have ever had. He's smart, too, although most of our dogs have been. I think dogs are about as smart as their people think they are (a lot like kids!), with a few notable exceptions.
Taking photos of him is a bit easier now that he is a doggy obedience school graduate; I can tell him to stand/stay (top photo) or sit/stay (second photo), and get cooperation. But he is still a puppy - and still has an alarming propensity to chew things up! Yes, there have been more casualties (don't ask Brian about his Thomas the Train engine). Jackson still likes to play puppy bite-games, too. I thought it would be easier when he lost his hypodermic-needle baby teeth, but all those shiny adult teeth are hard and strong. My hands aren't covered with little scabs any more - Brian's forearms are covered with little bruises!
Yes, I used the plural "dogs" in the title. No, we haven't gotten another dog, although a playmate for Action-Jackson is probably not a bad idea. Rosie often comes to mind, and I still miss her so. She was my constant but quiet companion, and that was more of a boon in my harried, hectic life than I ever realized - until she was abruptly absent. I tell myself that in a few years Jackson will probably be a real buddy, instead of another youngster to supervise and train, but that is a head exercise that doesn't help my heart. How DID she capture my heart so completely? How many tears can you cry for a dog?

That's it for now at . . .

11 comments:

Sharrie said...

That's funny. We went out and got Scooter a new toy. She will be here next week. Six months younger, female, tri rough collie. Sounds like she is cool like he is. Hope so! Old cocker will be happy to not be the toy of choice any more.

A :-) said...

How many tears? As many as it takes . . .

Rayna said...

I absolutely LOVE that photo of Jackson w/ his mouth open...so expressive. And dogs have gotten many, many of my tears over the years so, the other poster is right, as many as it takes :)

Alaska Shetland Shepherd said...

Tickle tickle on the carpet and a laughing Jackson! Too funny!

Yes, they steal our hearts and never give them all back...a piece always stays with the ones we've loved and lost. Still wish they lived 50 years...

Laura said...

You know, you could run a solid thread through the shoulder seams and the neckline - that would stop those two areas from "growing." The sleeves would still grow as would the length, but it would stay put on your bod, and you could roll up the sleeves. That way, you could keep the stunning results of all your hard work!

Jackson is a cutie. I have a pup, too, who has lost all the needle teeth, and is a challenge to wear her out, what with working full time. My border collie, who's 6, is still busy, but down-stays very well (a real boon). The pup is very, very busy, but also a cuddle bug - she likes to lie on me and chew her bones. This will be a problem when she weighs 60 pounds!!

Michelle at Boulderneigh said...

Laura, I like your idea. Secure the thread at one shoulder point, run it through the shoulder seam, along the back edge of the neck (it will change the shape of the neckline a bit since it drops down five rows across the back, but I don't think I'll care), through the other shoulder seam, and secure as tightly as I need it to stay on. Yes! Thank-you!

It's been a difficult, melancholy morning. I found Brian's chewed-up riding helmet, which made me mad at Jackson over another "casualty" and mad at Brian for leaving it out where the dog could get it, which dissolved me into tears again missing Rosie, who never chewed up anything but her Nylabones and the Goodwill stuffed animals we got her. What is that song? "Only the good die young...."

Kathy said...

Jackson needs a career. Have you thought of having him trained for sheep herding? Those Aussie (and Borders) need to have something to keep them occupied. A combo of no work plus puppy-brains equals destruction. :)

What about using twill tape inside instead of a thread? It might be a bit stronger.

And I still miss cats we had 30 years ago.

Sharon said...

A three pound sweater! I'm still laughing. I can hardly stand to wear my two pound sweater, and in fact, I don't. Laura's probably right and then you could fold the sleeves back like you intended to have cuffs.

country girl said...

I was going to suggest exactly what Laura suggested about your sari sonnet.

I have lost so many wonderful cats and dogs; it takes a special person to go out and do it again. They provide so much love; take your time with the mourning. You need to mourn as long as you need.

sheepsclothing said...

I too love that picture of Jackson with his mouth open. My beagle mix "baby" (10 year old baby) does the same thing and it always cracks me up. Have you tried that Bitter Apple stuff for the chewing issue? Might be distasteful enough to put him off chewing off-limits articles...

Amanda Holt Fraser said...

I can honestly understand and sympathize with your loss and new found friend... I still will burst out in tears years after the loss of one of my dogs, horses... they can never be replaced, but new four-legged companions bring us different belssings. We are so lucky to share in their journeys.