Friday, April 22, 2011

Character development

I have read numerous times that knitting is one of those activities that is beneficial to the brain, keeping it plastic and helping it ward off things like dementia. I have also discovered that knitting is quite character-building. It can teach patience, perseverance, perspective and acceptance, among other things. Not that I am looking for more character-building experiences; I find that life itself provides abundant opportunities to "build character"! Nevertheless, last night my knitting presented me with yet another opportunity to "grow."

For the first time in days, last night I had some quiet time to knit on Sakaki, Romi Hill's benefit shawl pattern. I stopped to admire my work - and noticed an odd loop of yarn more than halfway back. On closer inspection -
(see tip of needle; you can click to biggify) it was plain that I had somehow dropped a stitch. This isn't basic knitting, folks; there is no fixing this. I wanted to scream, but could hear my mother's voice in my head, saying, "It's good for your character."

Fortunately, there is solace in the fiber arts as well. Before throwing Sakaki in the frog pond, I consoled myself (and saved my sanity) with a little spindling:

Life goes on at . . .

17 comments:

Kelly Bartels said...

I think I would have walked away for a bit myself. Sorry about the dropped stitch Michelle.
I'm starting my WSWF project today using black wool from one of my girls. Why, oh why did I choose black for this project? :D

Laura said...

You can always just tack the stitch down, and call it good. I really, really had to look for it, and until I read the text, didn't see what it was you were pointing out. Therefore, no one else is likely too, either!! Hopefully you haven't frogged yet - and elect the less "invasive" surgical option!

Anonymous said...

Love your spindling. I've only been spinning for about a year and have not managed to get anything spun as fine as what is on your spindle. Good luck with your ripping back--just know you are joined in that effort--I'm on my 4th rip back on a baby sweater of all things. Happy Easter Weekend.

Susan said...

Character building? So that's what they call it! I won't tell you what I call it... It is always a good idea to have something to turn to that will sooth your froggin' blues. I am keeping a close eye on you vis a vis your Sakaki pattern, as I downloaded it, too. Lovely roving.

Becky Utecht said...

I downloaded the Sakaki pattern too, thanks to learning about it here on your blog. It's very beautiful. I agree with Laura about just tacking down your dropped stitch. But I jumped in the frog pond myself last night with my latest Tomten baby sweater. I knitted 40 rows on the body before realizing I had 122 stitches on my needle instead of 112. I really wasn't enjoying the garter stitch version anyway so I frogged the whole thing and will do a cable baby sweater instead. Unless I start in on the Sakaki shawl. :-)

Michelle said...

Laura, seriously, it is a major mistake and the whole thing would unravel from there with a little encouragement. I'm not sure I could confidently find all the parts I would need to "tack down," and I know it would bother me. I will try to rip back to a simple row and pick up my stitches, but am braced for having to start over.

Susan and Becky, I'm so glad you've downloaded Sakaki, too! It isn't a difficult knit, but my inelastic yarn does add challenge to the project.

sheepsclothing said...

I find that it helps to walk away from it for a while before frogging. The pain dulls some with time. It does look like a complicated pattern. I haven't attempted something like that in quite a while. What is that you are spinning? It's beautiful.

Michelle said...

Denise, that is a BFL sample from Corgi Hill Farm and "Songbird," the canary Jenkins Delight Turkish spindle I got at Woodland Woolworks this week.

Tammy G said...

Oh, I love the color of your roving. So pretty. I have yet to try spindling. Still trying my hand at Weaving. So many things I want to do and so litte time.

seashells said...

such beauty, the fiber and spindle. I really believe there is a lovely Turkish spindle in my future, all because of your blog. :-)

Sharon said...

At my library program last week, two sisters stayed behind to talk to me. They had purchased a Turkish spindle and couldn't understand how to connect the yarn to spin. I went through your posts and don't know the answer. There's no hook.

Cloverleaf Art and Fibre said...

I got the shawl pattern too, Michelle, but have not even chosen yarn yet. Thanks for leading the way with this project -- and for sharing those less than perfect moments.

Leigh said...

Confession - this is why I only do simple knitting! My husband says I'm enough of a character as it is.

Michelle said...

Here you go, Sharon!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZClZJpHyfs&feature=channel

(You might have to copy and paste the URL to get it to work.)

Marie said...

I had not heard about all the benefits of knitting! All the more reason to keep at it! I feel for you about the dropped stitch. I dropped on on my second pair of socks from the KAL I am doing and I was many, many, many rows from it! and I have not gotten the hang of picking stitches back up onto the needles after froggin (where did this term come from?). So since I used it as a 'learning' experience I tied a little knot and only I can tell. Maybe this coming winter I will try something more challenging and try out one of these beautiful shawls!! (no knot tying mistakes for them)

Michelle said...

Marie, picking up a dropped stitch in knit or purl is a very do-able challenge you should learn; you'll feel so clever once you're able to do it! My cyber-twin Melanie coached me through that the first time I dropped a sock stitch.

As for the term "frogging," when you unravel a project you are said to be "ripping out the yarn." Say "rip-it, rip-it, rip-it." Get it? You sound like a frog!

Marie said...

LOL!!! 'rip-it, rip-it' never would have thought of that!

I will remember to try and learn that next time I drop a stitch. that would be a good lesson to learn.

Thanks!