Monday, February 20, 2017

Life is just a chair of bowlies

(with a sweeping bow to Mary Engelbreit,
and a half-hearted apology for the bragging and photos that follow ;-)

After Rick's stunning woodturning debut under his client's tutelage, he has continued playing at our lathe at home. The first small bowl he turned here had a natural flaw that I've encouraged him to turn into a yarn hook. But he was on a bowl roll, so he set that one aside to try again. His third effort in Big-Leaf Maple resulted in an exquisite complement to the debut "salad" bowl. Then he tackled a chunk of black walnut, creating a vessel the perfect size and shape for a cake of yarn.








I think all of them are gorgeous, and could admire their beauty for hours while turning them in my hands to see the grain and chatoyance. Rick sees and comments on their "imperfections," and wishes they were better (with the exception of the salad bowl; he's pretty happy with that one). I guess that's okay, because that means he'll keep "practicing"!

That's it for now from . . .

14 comments:

Theresa said...

Lovely, all of them. Yarn bowls are so yummy especially ones made by loving hands!

Mama Pea said...

If Rick ever decides to hang up his vet tools, he could make some cash selling his bowls. The ones I've seen seem to go for good prices. ('Course, I don't know how many [MANY, I'm sure] hours go into making one . . . )

Florida Farm Girl said...

Kudos to Rick. He's doing great work. Now, about the upholstery on that chair! We have one with it too!! Hope things improve at your household.

Susan said...

He's a natural talent! Those are beautiful!!!

Debbie said...

Way to go Rick! He's on to something for sure!

sylkan said...

The bowls are lovely, but I got the biggest smile out of your word play, the Chair of Bowlies.

C-ingspots said...

Their uniqueness and their beautiful imperfections are what make them perfect. Refreshing to see handmade, instead of mass-produced with no personality. You guys now have your own wood lathe?

thecrazysheeplady said...

Fabulous!

Rain said...

I agree with all of the comments, those bowls are wonderful. What a great skill to have! Imperfections make things very unique, but I guess we are always our own worst critics!

Claire Moxon-Waltz said...

Wow - what wonderful creations, and such beautiful woods! As the daughter of a wood turner, I can confidently say that Rick certainly has a talent for choosing the right piece of wood for his turned objects. He is doing excellent work. I think that wood turning has a sort of therapeutic side, as do many art forms - one gets lost in the creation of things, and that can be so rejuvenating. I absolutely love your post title - at first, I was baffled....what does she mean by a chair of bowlies, and then of course I turned it around and got it. Thanks for the giggle!

FullyFleeced said...

beautiful bowlies! :)

Marlene jones said...

Looking at each one just makes me want to hold them and stroke them, he has brought out their natural beauty.

Sandra @ Thistle Cove Farm said...

DROOL!

Michelle said...

Thanks for enjoying them with me, everyone! I wish I could pass them around to you in real time so you could truly appreciate their beauty.

Theresa, I think two of them are excellent yarn bowl candidates; I might just have to press that black walnut vessel into service!

Mama Pea, they take a lot longer than I ever imagined; now I know why they are so expensive!

FFG, we have a couch and chair with that upholstery and I love everything about them. We actually designed the shape and color of our living space around them when we built our house.

Susan and Debbie, I think so, too!

I can't take credit for the word play, Sylvia. Mary Engelbreit's illustration using it has long been a favorite of mine.

Lorie, my dad gave us his several years ago, thinking my guys would have fun playing on it.

Aren't they, Sara?

I am certainly my own, Rain!

That's high compliment from you, Claire, with your background! This is Rick's first real "hobby," and I think it IS therapeutic.

Thank-you, Denise.

Marlene, they really must be held and stroked to be fully appreciated. :-)

Here's a tissue, Sandra! ;-)