Tuesday, March 05, 2013

Free at last

Pictures and paragraphs yearn to be utilized, but fetters of obligation confine them to my mind and hard drive. When this push/pull continues for more than a day, I feel myself fraying around the edges. Blogging is an outlet – "me time." My thoughts and photographs are not important in the vast scheme of things, but I need to express them. Tonight, I finally have some time to hear myself think – a rare commodity around here. My MacBook on my lap, rain tapping on the window, the wood stove quietly crackling, dogs napping nearby, no humans within sight or sound;
I can feel the stress draining away....

It feels strange not to be obsessing over the backsides of my ewes this year. No watching for udder development or fetal movement; no anticipating the number, color or gender of lambs I'll be getting for 'shepherds' Christmas.' I suppose I should be thankful that things will be simpler this year; no lambing jugs, no evaluating and deciding who to keep and who to market, no weaning (no yelling mamas and babies!).
Ewe's not fat, ewe's fluffy – wait, I think ewe IS fat!
Four weeks from today the sheep will look considerably smaller, clean coats covering freshly sheared bodies. A few might get a new look sooner than that, if any can be rooed (if this is an unfamiliar word, click on it for an excellent tutorial complete with pictures). Last year I was able to roo Blake, but so far he is showing no signs of being in the rise. Cadbury and Sarai, on the other hand, are.
WhitePine Sarai, fine-fleeced black katmoget
I need to set aside time to investigate that more fully!

That's it for today from . . .

12 comments:

  1. Quiet time alone to express one's thought is such a treasure. You expressed yours beautifully.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank-you, Wanda; I know you understand!

      Delete
  2. That opening scene was perfect...I'd love to have one of my own!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wish I could gift one to you, friend!

      Delete
  3. I envy you that pretty hay and that lovely green grass! :-) Hay has been less than good here this year, but it gives them something to sift through and gnaw on. Glad you had some time to relax and get your thoughts down, it's a rare commodity here too. I am looking forward to no babies this year. :-)

    Tammy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We did get good hay last year, although we paid handsomely for it. As for the green, green grass, just remember that ours will be dried up and gone when yours looks lush!

      Delete
  4. I am so glad you got time to blog. I always look so forward to reading it. Can hardly wait for some more fleece. Shiralyn

    ReplyDelete
  5. What an interesting concept! Sheep are totally unknown animals to my upbringing, so all this stuff is new to me. Their coats look funny, but it makes perfect sense to have them to protect the fleece.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Great Post! I enjoyed the videos on rooing. I am hoping to start my own flock soon and would like to have shetlands. I come from a horse background also (driving-not riding) so sheep are new to me. Lots to learn. Thanks for the informative blog.
    Heather in PA

    ReplyDelete
  7. Loved reading about rooing. I pretty much do the same to our English Angora's. Didn't even know that some sheep did this. I thought all had to be sheared. With the English Angora's more people are trying to raise theirs to hold the wool and need to be clipped. I prefer to pluck the fiber, as stated in rooing, you don't lose any of the wool. Plus no second cuts! Very interesting. Glad you took the time to blog. I totally understand that...

    ReplyDelete
  8. Oh boy, do I know what you mean about finding time to blog. I don't have any children at home (not for a long, long time) and still struggle to find those uninterrupted, quiet times to gather my thoughts and write. Your green grass is beautiful! Ours is still so brown, but daffodils are blooming through the snow, so there's hope.
    (I raised three boys, so I know those struggles, too!)

    ReplyDelete
  9. No mothers and baby chicks here for us, this year, either, Michelle... a year off to assess things and try to decide what to do about our latest tragedy. Your sheep look so content... and how I long to sit by a crackling fire!

    ReplyDelete

I'm a blogger - I love comments!