Thursday, September 25, 2008

Positive developments

This week, Brian had a trial lesson with a new violin teacher. This one also teaches "fiddle," and can commit to a much more regular schedule. Brian likes his old teacher and didn't think he would like a new one, but he changed his mind after meeting her and getting assigned two fiddle tunes along with his scales, etude and hymns. This morning he woke up early so he could play those two new tunes for his daddy (Rick has been getting home late this week). It is so cool when a youngster gets excited about music! Rick had to pull out his guitar and play bluegrass with his boy; I had to capture it on camera. No, neither of them bothered getting dressed first. :-)
Another positive development around here regards Brian's horse Oliver. Ollie was professionally started, but neither Rick nor I have put the "wet saddle blanket" time in on him that he needs to make him a solid mount. As a result, Brian doesn't want to ride much, and has had his confidence shaken when he does ride. A new friend of ours has offered to put some training time in on Oliver when he's here (his wife just moved here to teach at our church school but he still lives in Tonasket, WA for now and comes down once a month). Oliver has been making dramatic progress this week, so today Rob gave Brian a lesson on his horse, showing him what he's been doing and expecting so Brian can start riding his horse correctly and with confidence.(Oreo thought it all rather boring.)
Remember the "sheep wheelings and dealings" I referred to in an earlier post? Well, there are positive developments there as well. It means giving up my "Shetland Ambassador" Valentine, something I never could have imagined doing before focusing my breeding goals on polled Shetland sheep, but Tammy has agreed to take her so I know she is going to one of the best homes possible. (Yes, this means Tammy will have TWO mother/daughter pairs from me!) Taking Valentine's place at Boulderneigh is a lovely, likely poll-carrier ewe lamb. Meet Owl Hill Buffy (registration pending): The "sheep shuffle" will take place this weekend around the Oregon Flock and Fiber Festival.

Lastly, we have proof that both of our newest hens are "carrying their weight" around here. Ebony's green eggs are an easy "tell," but I wasn't sure if Tawny's eggs would be distinguishable from the Rhodies'. Then yesterday Brian saw her in a nest box, and guarded the doorway to the henhouse until she laid her egg, which is a slightly lighter brown than the Rhodie eggs. The last hen to join our little flock, a Welsummer, is coming down to OFFF with Tammy; her eggs will be a distinctive dark reddish brown. How fun!

That's it for now at . . .

11 comments:

Pine Pod Farm said...

My sister played violin starting at the age of 5, I took a little bit of violin!

Garrett808 said...

oh praise GOD you got that beautiful musket! I will send you a deposit NOW for one of her lambs!

Nothing makes me feel better now that i know you are getting her. PHEW. I was just sick over not being able to get her! I'm nearly emotional now knowing that I know where she is going to be.

THANK YOU and CONGRATULATIONS on such a stunning ewe lamb!

Michelle at Boulderneigh said...

Wow, Garrett, I couldn't ask for more positive affirmation than that from another Shetland breeder! I may hold you to that deposit. :-) I wasn't planning to breed her this fall unless a buyer appears for my fiber boys, but if I had a deposit on one of her lambs, I'd consider it!

A :-) said...

Oh Wow - that new ewe is so pretty - her fleece is a gorgeous pale caramel . . . just imagining all the stuff you could make from the yarn you'll spin up! Congratulations on the new addition. :-) Oh - and glad there is music at your house - you can never have too much of that!

Pamela said...

How wonderful to have a house full of music first thing in the morning!

And I'm smitten with that carmel colored little girl. Wowsers!

I've been meaning to ask. Are you developing a polled line for safety? Or aesthics? I find it dead interesting how you are working on it and especially the successes you're having!

~~Sittin.n.Spinnin said...

LOL you might have caught a bit of clothing in the picture, Rick looks naked ;-)
Brian has a well rounded cariculum doesnt he. He is a very lucky young man. And he looks good on a horse!

Michelle at Boulderneigh said...

Hi Pamela, yes, I prefer the boys without horns as they can't do as much damage to property or people (or other sheep!). I have to admit that at first I found the polled boys homely; the big horns really do look majestic (unless the ram has just been sheared; then they just look silly!). But now I actually prefer the poll look! Now I just hope more people on the West Coast become interested so I have a market for my stock.

Becky, Rick didn't want me showing him in his underwear, so that just left skin to show! Ha!

~~Sittin.n.Spinnin said...

ROFLMAO!!!! Too funny! lol!

Kathleen said...

My daughter also played the violin and loved it, until an impatient teacher began to use punishment as a motivator instead of praise. Then she put the violin down and never picked it up again. Such a shame.

Congratulations on your new lamb! She's a beauty! I think I like the looks of a polled sheep, too. Horns can be magnificent on the right animal, but the polled look is a little more polished-looking to me. Do you find that animals with horns are more assertive than those without? I've noticed it in goats, and am wondering about that with sheep.

Michelle at Boulderneigh said...

Kathleen, the only adult ram I've had is polled Braveheart, but I HAVE heard from breeders in this much longer than I have been that yes, Shetlands with horns (rams AND ewes) are quite aware they are "armed" and will use them. Polled rams can sometimes be rank and should be culled if dangerously so, but they still do less damage than a fellow with a big rack.

Kathy said...

Wow! I can't believe you're parting with Val! I remember when you were so happy to get her...