Tuesday, March 18, 2008

A pregnant pause

Yep, I'm finally convinced I will have lambs, although I still don't know when. Sunday morning I felt the wee beginnings of an udder forming on Rechel, to go along with her suspiciously bulging sides (I didn't think it was obvious in my photo of the three ewes, but Lauren picked up on it). This morning I checked everyone's udder area again. To my surprise, Dinah is starting to make a bag, too! I saw Dinah bred on November 25; she should be five weeks out from lambing if that's the breeding that took. (Would she have allowed Braveheart's advances if she had settled earlier? Anyone out there know?) Below are top and side views of the two expectant ladies, Rechel first:
Valentine is still a mystery; she is as slab-sided and "flat-chested" as ever. She was covered on November 29; I suppose she could be carrying a single and not show a thing for several more weeks.

That's it for now at . . .

6 comments:

Lauren said...

Hooray, I was right for once and I'm soooo glad you will get your lambs after all. Life is good.

~~Sittin.n.Spinnin said...

The ewe that lambed Saturday here looked slab-sided but had udders the size of basket balls, she had very healthy twins! You just never know what's coming, I would have sworn on it, bet on it, whatever that she was going to have a single.

Kathy said...

A ewe that has settled will not succumb to a ram's advances. And you can't really go by anything other than the bag developing just from looking. I've seen sheep that look like they'll have triplets and only have one, then a straight sided ewe have twins. It's just like us...we all carry 'em differently. :)

A :-) said...

OK - I know nothing about sheep, which is why I didn't guess :-) But clearly you're going to have some baby lambies soon :-) That Valentine is a very pretty color!

Laura said...

Ewes will start udder development anywhere from a month to 2 weeks before lambing - and there are those who don't develop an udder until after lambing (cull those quickly!!). As for covering after being settled, I've seen my sheep engage in recreational sex - no damage to the unborn lambs occurs; the ewe is just a hussy (keep those). When you're checking udders, look for an udder that is very tight, and the teats stick out almost horizontally. That in addition to their tails sticking out and being very soft and squishy at the head of their tail is a sure sign that lambing is immanent.

I'm waiting for lambs again - the early group lambs are 50-60 days old now, and hoovering the creep. My oldest ewe looks like she'll pop any day.

Good luck!!

Jen and Rich Johnson said...

Hi Michelle - I'm guessing your ewes are ok with being handled, have you ever tried to feel baby lambs moving around in the womb? I've done it before, just set your hand on the bare spot under the back legs, I've felt baby lambs moving around this year already. v. cool!