Sunday, January 27, 2008

Strike one, followed by a tackle

Yes, I'm mixing my metaphors here; but hey, they fit. Yesterday morning during chores Braveheart rammed me for the first time. Not hard enough to hurt (he is, after all, hornless and small, and we were in the confines of the sheep fold), but it was still a hit. I was on top of him in a flash, yelling "NO!" and kneeling on him for a good minute before letting him up to shake off the dirty bedding and think about what had just transpired. I, too, need to think about what happened, and remember to keep an eye on him.

Jackson got hit last week, too. After putting the sheep in their little pasture, I let Jackson off lead and, as usual, he visited the sheep through the fence. Dinah took exception to his forward behavior and rammed him. I wasn't close enough to see just where he was hit or how, only that his head was partially through the woven wire when it happened. He came kiyi-ing back to me at the barn, and hasn't been nearly so anxious to fraternize with the woolies ever since. It will be awhile before he is able (and willing!) to help keep Braveheart at a respectful distance!

That's it for now at . . .

8 comments:

Allena said...

I use a similar process, but I do add a loud and aggressive discussion about lamb chops and my enjoyment of such things lol.

Jerome has butted Beau twice and gotten thrown. That was during breeding season, so I don't think was so bad or unexpected. Beau did all the feeding, and so it was good that he is big enough to throw a bigger boy like Jerome.

They just don't understand that you can't take the heat lol. Just like horses just don't understand why you can't take a stout kick lol.

Such frail and puny creatures we are.

A :-) said...

Owee! Hope you and Jackson are both OK :-)

shepherdchik said...

Ahh yes, the head through the fence bashing injury. I've been paranoid that my Pomeranian would get bashed too. He does not know he is small and he thinks going to the barn for chores is a great adventure. He often puts his head through the wire to sniff noses at the sheep and I am very fearful he will get bashed. He only weighs 5 lbs so it would not take much of a hit to hurt him seriously. I do tuck him in my coat when I get near the ram pen so that he cannot tempt fate by putting his head through the fence up there. Jackson will likely forget his injury quickly and be right back to it.

Kathy said...

Yup...even tho small and w/o horns, any ram is dangerous. Time to keep a watch of your back.
I usulally throw them and knee or sit on them growling like something that eats sheep - which is true. Glad to hear you're still Alpha.

Windyridge said...

Something that works well too is lifting them up off of their front legs. Just lift them up off the ground, front legs up in your hands like a dog jumping up on you. They don't like it and think twice about eliciting that response again. Our young guy hasn't made any moves like that yet and he may not. That's why we picked that breed. But I am looking out for it.

Texan Will Travel said...

You go, big sis! :)

Laura C - Finney Creek Farm said...

If you only have one ram, you will have this problem. Get him a couple of wethers - he'll settle down. I have 9 rams - they all live together, and not a one has butted me in 3 years. They have their only little heirarchy, which takes you out of the running as a potential target. The one ram that butted me became dog food.

~~Sittin.n.Spinnin said...

Laz acted like he was going to butt last year, and he has been doing it again this year. Medium sized or not, I dont want him hitting me! There is no way I could lift him up, although I can see why they wouldnt like it, but I usually stamp the ground like another ram would, he backs off. I watch him very closely.